The political week in 5 points

A disastrous key note speech for Theresa May is reflective of her leadership journey thus far. At the Conservative Party conference on Wednesday, everything that could go wrong for the Prime Minister did go wrong. May’s ambition to speak of the ‘British dream’ soon became a nightmare as she began choking and coughing over her key points. To make matters worse, a prankster made it to the front of the stage to hand Mrs May a mock P45, as the backdrop literally started to break down behind her. The whole ordeal was indicative of a her leadership journey thus far, uncertain, unassured and unfortunate.

Arlene Foster and Michelle O’Neill squabble over the constitutional position of Northern Ireland. Last week, these two party leaders took to the stage together at the Conservative Party conference’s ‘Ulster Fry’ event. Upon being asked if an Irish Language Act would make Northern Ireland ‘less british’, the Sinn Féin Northern leader replied “the north isn’t British”, a statement wish issued rebuke from the DUP leader who asserted that it was. The squabble illustrated both leaders complete disregard for the essence of the Good Friday Agreement that recognises the contested nature of the state and the ability of its citizens to identify as either Irish or British.

Massacre of US citizens at Nevada concert reignites the ‘Second Amendment’ debate. The Second Amendment to the United States is the right of citizenry to ‘keep and bear arms’. This ‘right’ enabled gunman Stephen Paddock to gun down 58 individuals at a music concert from a hotel window on the Las Vegas Strip, injuring up to 500 more. Congressman Chris Murphy from Connecticut, stated that this mass shooting- the worse in american history- was a direct result of ‘public policy choices’ made by congress.

DUP deputy leader defends the DUP-Tory deal. Also speaking at the Tory conference, DUP deputy leader, Nigel Dodds, reassured that the ‘confidence and supply’ deal his party have with the Conservative party is not a temporary one, but rather will last for the duration of the mandate. However, the £1bn ‘cash-for-votes’ money has yet to makes its way to Northern Ireland, let alone been distributed or spent.

The ‘war of words’ between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un intensifies. Speaking this week, President Trump alluded to the point that if diplomacy continued to be a failed tactic when dealing with a hostile North Korea, other measures would instead be used. Trump did not specify what exactly he meant, but rising tensions between the two leaders, in regards to growing missiles concerns, does not leave the mind wondering as to what the President was insinuating.