The political week in 5 points

The illegal flying of paramilitary flags in South Belfast. The newly elected MP for South Belfast, Emma Little-Pengelly, was caught up in controversy this week after she failed to condemn the flying of paramilitary flags in the mixed constituency of South Belfast. This is worrisome as it sends the alarming message that Ms. Little-Pengelly fails to understand her role as a champion for all of South Belfast’s constituents, regardless of class or creed. You can read Northern Slant Editor Connor Daly’s take on the situation here: Paramilitaries – and appeasement – are plagues on our society.

The rights of EU citizens living in the UK post-Brexit. One of the many concerns for Remainers in light of the UK’s exit from the European Union is the protection of the rights of EU citizens living and working in the UK. Although the Prime Minister has since agreed to allow EU citizens living and working in the UK the same rights as Britons, it has been revealed that whilst serving as Home Secretary between 2010-2016, Theresa May unilaterally blocked such an offer in the days succeeding the Brexit Referendum. This flip-flopping does little to support her ‘strong and stable’ slogan but rather devalues the image of those European citizens who contribute so much to our society.

Jeremy Corbyn at Glastonbury. Leader of the UK Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, addressed thousands at Glastonbury on Saturday with a brave and heartfelt speech about his desired direction of travel for the UK. The speech itself, the tone and the choice of audience illustrates exactly why Labour attracted the young vote in the way that they did during the general election campaign. In contrast to that of Theresa May, Mr Corbyn is portraying a new image of political leadership that presents a genuine change of direction, a direction which is increasingly gaining momentum.

The Grenfell Tower fire is exposing to the rest of the world how we treat our working classes. After 79 people lost their lives in the Grenfell tower fire, over 60 tower blocks across England have now been named as unsafe. This has opened up a number of questions regarding governance and accountability in the social housing sector and relevant governmental departments. It also serves as a stark reminder that the powers-that-be have a long way to go when it comes to truly fighting for the interests of the working classes. For further analysis, you can catch Eamonn Cunningham’s article here: Grenfell Towter and the reality of the disadvantaged.

S.A.V.I.A (Survivors and Victims of Institutional Abuse). This week the ‘Survivors and Victims of Institutional Abuse’ campaigners staged a protest in Belfast in the face of the current impasse at Stormont. Political stalemate has delayed state-backed compensation for the ageing victims who are long overdue justice. This delay has occurred because the findings of the four-year enquiry cannot be presented before the Northern Ireland Assembly; the process of victims receiving compensation cannot begin until the our power-sharing institutions have been restored.